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americanguide:

SMALL TOWN DINERS - INDIANA

Meals served in smartly fronted little restaurants and lunch stands retain the unmistakable tang of country cooking. 

Indiana: A Guide to the Hoosier State (WPA, 1941)

Small town diners in Indiana: stop in a good one and you will likely meet some incredible people; owners who love to cook and are adept at running a business on a shoestring. Small town cafes are personal spaces that reflect the ups and downs of their surrounding community.  They provide a central meeting spot and a sociable place to eat alone.

How to rate a café in the Hoosier state? If hand-breaded tenderloin and homemade pie are on the menu, your order will not disappoint.

Guide Notes:

—locations—

  1. Mary Ann Rubio, Family Café, Knox, IN
  2. The Grill, LaCrosse, IN
  3. Happy Days Café, Wakarusa, IN
  4. White House Hamburgers, Logansport, IN
  5. Hamlet Café, Hamlet, IN
  6. Crockpot Café, Walkerton, IN
  7. Teel’s Family Restaurant, Mentone, IN
  8. Northside Diner, Chesterton, IN
  9. The Nook, Columbia City, IN
  10. Woodland Inn, Woodland, IN

* * *

Kay Westhues is a photographer based in South Bend, IN. Through her work she aims to describe the vitality and complexity of places and people whose lives are often overlooked and unexamined. She is inspired by the ways rural tradition and history are interpreted and transformed in the present day. You can see more of her work at kaywesthues.com or follow her latest project on tumblr (kwesthues.tumblr.com).

This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.

Source: americanguide
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drinkingbrandywithfranksinatra:

Gustav Klimt - Death and Life. 1910.

drinkingbrandywithfranksinatra:

Gustav Klimt - Death and Life. 1910.

(via champagneparty)

Source: facebook.com
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americanguide:

THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SNOWDOWN - DURANGO, COLORADO

As the nation worries about the effects of Colorado’s recent legalization of recreational marijuana, it can rest assured that a Coloradan’s first love is booze. And when it comes to booze, Colorado’s premier winter celebration, Snowdown, delivers.

Back in 1979, Snowdown was created as a town-sized party to brighten the long Southwest Colorado winter — when the sun can duck behind the mountains at 2:30 pm.

With more than 100 events spread over dozens of locations for five days, it seems like the entire town turns out at some point. Though there are a few events aimed at families, the majority of them are for adults, and those adults are just as likely to be day-drunk 70 year olds as they are to be students from Fort Lewis College. 

Across the city, bars are packed for days on end with people in costume.  This year’s theme was “Safari So Good" — so lots of animal prints and pith helmets. Locals took part in events such as beer pong, the Bar Olympics, thumb wars, trivia contests, keg lid golf, outhouse stuffing, racy fashion shows and general heavy drinking, all leading up to the Snowdown fireworks and the wild light parade down Main Avenue.

Guide Notes

* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

Source: inlandwest
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newmanology:

Black History Month Magazines: The Black Panther

Not really a magazine, it was a weekly newspaper published by the Black Panther Party from 1967-80. Art directed by Revolutionary Artist and Minister of Culture Emory Douglas, The Black Panther covers were a combination of Douglas’s own powerful illustration, collage, high-contrast photographs, and poster-like graphics.

Many of these covers are courtesy of Babylon Falling and Emory Douglas Art, both great resources for The Black Panter covers, inside pages, posters, and graphics.

Source: newmanology
Photo Set

newmanology:

Black History Month Magazines: The Black Panther

Not really a magazine, it was a weekly newspaper published by the Black Panther Party from 1967-80. Art directed by Revolutionary Artist and Minister of Culture Emory Douglas, The Black Panther covers were a combination of Douglas’s own powerful illustration, collage, high-contrast photographs, and poster-like graphics.

Many of these covers are courtesy of Babylon Falling and Emory Douglas Art, both great resources for The Black Panter covers, inside pages, posters, and graphics.

Source: newmanology